Iowa Cattle

at IAcattle.com

The Iowa Beef Industry Council is an organization working for the cattle producers of Iowa in areas of education, promotion and research. The programs are funded by the Beef Checkoff, $1.00 per head collected on all Iowa cattle when they are sold. The Iowa Beef Industry Council office is located in Ames, in the same building as the Iowa Cattlemen�s Association (the membership division of Iowa�s beef industry). Fifteen members direct the activities of the Board of the Iowa Beef Industry Council. Ten cattle producers are elected by the membership of the Iowa Cattlemen�s Association; other representatives include the Iowa Secretary of Agriculture, the Iowa State University Dean of the College of Agriculture and the Iowa Livestock Auction Markets. The Iowa Beef Industry Council is one of 45 state beef councils. 50 cents out of every checkoff dollar collected goes to the Cattlemen�s Beef Board in Denver, Colorado, which oversees checkoff programs. The remaining 50 cents is held in Iowa for state coordinated activities. Iowa sends approximately half of their remaining 50 cents on to national promotion efforts. The Iowa Beef Industry Council is also affiliated with the National Cattlemen�s Beef Association, headquartered in Denver, Colorado. Beef promotion, information and research programs are coordinated between the 45 state beef councils, the Cattlemen�s Beef Board, and the National Cattlemen�s Beef Association.


USDA Cattle Reports

Des Moines

IA

Denison Wtd Avg Feeder Cattle Auction (Thu)

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Des Moines

IA

Knoxville Wtd Avg Feeder Cattle Auction (Fri)

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Des Moines

IA

Sigourney Wtd Avg Feeder Cattle Auction (Mon)

NW_LS140

Des Moines

IA

Iowa-South Minnesota Direct Feeder Cattle Weekly (Mon)

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Des Moines

IA

National Steer & Heifer Estimated Grading Percent Report

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Des Moines

IA

National Direct Feeder Pig Report (Fri)

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Des Moines

IA

Kalona Wtd Avg Sheep Auction (Wed)

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Des Moines

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Weekly West Coast Cow Carcass (Fri)

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Des Moines

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Dunlap Wtd Avg Feeder Cattle Auction (Fri)

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Des Moines

IA

Tama Wtd Avg Feeder Cattle Auction (Mon)

NW_LS726

Des Moines

IA

Sheldon Wtd Avg Feeder Cattle Auction (Thu)

NW_LS727

Des Moines

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Lamoni Wtd Avg Feeder Cattle Auction (Thu)

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Des Moines

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Russell Wtd Avg Feeder Cattle Auction (Mon)

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Des Moines

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Creston Wtd Avg Feeder Cattle Auction (Fri)

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Des Moines

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Humeston Wtd Avg Feeder Cattle Auction (Tue)

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Des Moines

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Bloomfield Wtd Avg Feeder Cattle Auction (Wed)

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Des Moines

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Centerville Wtd Avg Feeder Cattle Auction (Thu)

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Des Moines

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Dunlap Wtd Avg Slaughter Cattle Auction (Tue)

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Des Moines

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Tama Wtd Avg Slaughter Cattle Auction (Wed)

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Des Moines

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Iowa Weekly Feeder Cattle Wtd Avg Summary (Mon) NW_LS795

These are a few of the topics being discussed on our Forum.
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CattleToday.com
CattleToday's Q & A Boards are a Cattle Forum for swapping information and asking and answering questions about breed, health problems, beginners questions and jokes about cattle and horses.

Oh Crap!!!!
by Bright Raven (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 06:28:44 GMT+5)
I am always skeptical of these YouTube and Facebook clips. I think this is obviously staged.



Animal Control
by True Grit Farms (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 06:28:40 GMT+5)
Oh, there just so cute.



Sold in less than 30 minutes
by Bright Raven (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 06:22:52 GMT+5)
wbvs58 wrote:Just on the money, that looks like paper money to me. All our money now is plastic, not like in credit cards but plastic money, supposed to be harder to counterfeit. But of course then you people don't like change like changing to the metric system of weighing and measuring, sticking with the imperial system something to do with your strong allegence to her majesty QE11.

Ken

The US doesn't care if it's currency is counterfeited. No one in the world can compete with our Tresury Dept. in printing money.



Triple 17
by Texasmark (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 06:20:07 GMT+5)
Addressed to the respondees:

Back in the '60's Texas was suffering from Cotton Fever. Blackland had been cottoned out. A bunch of PhDs got together at Renner, Tx. (now incorporated into the city limits of Plano, N. of Dallas) and with donations from farmers and others did and still do ag. research in an attempt to put Texas back in the ag. green.

I have used their experiments, bound into a hard copy book as my guide for the past 35+ years.

On the advice given here, where did you guys come up with your advice? With the cost of commercial fertilizer these days and the haying competition around here, being correct matters.

TAMU (Texas A&M University) and their ag. extension dept. do a good job of helping us out and will do soil samples if sent in with 10 bucks helping us to plan our needs when we submit our soil and our aspirations for the coming year's crop.

Problem I have personally, is that if I want to custom tailor my fertilizer needs to the results of the soil testing and plans, I have to go to the bulk plant to get it custom mixed. Well that's not always an option and the choices you get in the bag, like triple this or triple that, or the other options, don't suit my needs and I am just puking money.

Also I have a coastal patch and an annual patch. The coastal patch doesn't offer the convenience of putting the "food" where it will get used. Only option I see is to put down your P and K in the fall and work it in and in the spring after the field has rebounded and the weeds are mature, top dress your Bermuda and then after every cutting top dress it again.......if you get the yield to support that kind of money invested in food.

On the annual patch, I planted Gotcha Plus Sudan-Sorghum again this year but half the field got Austrian Winter Peas panted last fall with no fert. and worked in this spring before planting. I may post pictures of the difference later on but the difference is amazing even with me adding a couple hundred # of triple 13 and 33-0-0, worked in B4 planting and top dressed on the non pea part. Next year the whole patch is going in peas for food and I might just take a year off and put the Bermuda patch in peas and hope for the best for next year's crop of that. Since Bermuda loves to be cultivated (mine does anyway) it just might be the thing to do.



Shooting Dogs
by True Grit Farms (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 06:15:27 GMT+5)
I still don't buy that nonsense, if the dogs owner was a responsible person his dogs would still be alive. A responsible person doesn't let his animals run loose on someone else's property, especially during hunting season. A varmint isn't a specific breed. According to Webster, Definition of varmint. 1 : an animal considered a pest; specifically : one classed as vermin and unprotected by game law. 2 : a contemptible person : rascal; broadly : person, fellow.
I guess I just can't grasp how some folks figure, likewise I'm sure.



We're New from the Lone Star State
by Son of Butch (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 05:55:11 GMT+5)
In case you missed this. Here is a very good link for anyone starting in cattle posted by your fellow Texan BK9954
https://farmstyle.com.au/news/understan ... mall-farms

welcome to cattle boards



Steer blocking a bull from breeding?
by Son of Butch (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 05:42:30 GMT+5)
M.Magis wrote:Can't say its never happened, but its not something I'd worry about. It would be unusual.

+1



What is hereditary from a cow
by elkwc (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 05:40:43 GMT+5)
Nesikep wrote:Has she had mastitis or something before that would have caused her to lose the production of the front quarters? If it was caused by mastitis and she raises a good calf anyhow, I could perhaps take a gamble on that.. if that's just the way she is, not a chance
I do consider that bad, not because it just looks bad, but because it affects functionality.

I'm a tit guy.. a total sucker for a nice set of 'em
Here's a 16 year old cow


10 year old daughter's udder (poke yer eyes out on them!)


granddaughter with great granddaughter


It's definitely hereditary, and I've found it typically takes about 3 generations to get from a bad udder to something good.. don't ask how I know

Nesi how long to improve milk production if they have an excellent bag?



Weak Calf
by Koffi Babone (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 05:36:52 GMT+5)
Electrolytes should not be mixed with milk because they are formulated to be mixed with water.

Electrolytes are like Gatorade powder. Would you mix it with milk or juice? If you did, the end product would be too concentrated ("too salty"). The idea behind electrolytes is to replace the salts and minerals the body is loosing (usually because of diarrhea). If the liquid being given is too concentrated, it will have the opposite effect. It will draw water out of the body and dehydrate even more. If you drink something too salty, it does not quench thirst, it dehydrates even more.



What is this - skin condition?
by wbvs58 (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 03:07:58 GMT+5)
Most things will go away on their own unless their immune system is compromised, maybe you should test her for Pestivirus as a PI.

Ken



Things I Did Wrong
by Nesikep (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 01:24:52 GMT+5)
Just shouldn't have sold it! Neighbor has one of them, nice little machines
Was quite a haul getting it to our place with 12% grades on washboard roads




Safety
by Nesikep (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 01:21:50 GMT+5)
running a chainsaw left handed would be like trying to use them stupid ergonomic (for righthanders) scissors with your left hand.. just doesn't work!



What the heck does this mean about aggression?
by Nesikep (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 01:20:26 GMT+5)
Coolest headed bull I've ever had... whorl slightly above eye line


very lovey dovey heifer..


No whorl.. she's been a little skittish her whole life, but suddenly will surprise you and be all nice.. she was the first to come up to one of my friends, a complete stranger.. go figure

Mother of that heifer and the bull.. well.. she's got a medium-high whorl, and is a docile cow, but will lose her marbles if you have to work her.. she's not aggressive, but gets worked up easily.. none of her offspring have shown that though.



Inbred calf
by Nesikep (Posted Thu, 25 May 2017 00:46:27 GMT+5)
I think part of the higher death rate may also be from lesser quality colostrum from a young cow.. older cows have more colostrum and a better variety of antibodies.. they've been there, done that, and the immune system remembers it.

If she's a truly valued cow, I'd wean the calf early and not breed her this year.. if she's just a run-of-the-mill cow, make her work and what happens, happens



Share cropping cattle. Is this a fair deal?
by WalnutCrest (Posted Wed, 24 May 2017 23:02:08 GMT+5)
cjmc wrote:WalnutCrest wrote:Not going broke is the most important thing.

How will open cows be marketed and replaced, and on who's nickel?

How will dead cows be replaced and on who's nickel?

Who decides when a cow is sold? What if cows are open and you want to sell, but your guy wants to give them another chance? Or vise versa?

What if some heifers get retained? Who's heifers are those?

And a big one ... who decides what cows to buy to start?

...etc.

A suggestion ... you buy the cows and lease them to him for a fixed $ / head / day rate ... he covers feed, mineral, vet, transportation, etc ... and he gets all the calves. Open cows are sold and the money goes to you. Home raised heifers are retained by this guy to replace opens and death loss and they are his cattle.

Set the day rate so you make money regardless of the commodity market.

I'd also consider telling him that you get to pick 2-5 of the best bull calves to keep back as home raised bulls to replace the bought bulls so as to reduce your cost. If your selection criteria is good, the herd will get better and you'll save money.

Open cows will be sold at the barn, I get the money. If a cow dies because he wasn't taking care of them he pays me the going rate for a cull cow & I buy a new cow to replace her. I make all decisions on what heifers to keep, what cows to buy when to sell cows. I decide on what cows to buy at the start.

So all retained heifers come out of your 1/3rd of the calf crop?

So, pretending for a second ...

100 cows ... 90 get bred ... 10 opens are sold and you keep the money

87 calves are born (three are aborted or die during birth, the dams are subsequently sold and you keep the money)

44 heifers and 43 bull calves ... 29 cakes are due to you and 58 to your partner

If you have 12 open spots, can you elect to make (say) 18 of your 29 calves the nicest heifers (in hopes that 12 get bred the next year)? Does he take care of them for no cost to you (since they won't calve for two years)? And if that's going to work, which of the other 69 calves are your 11 final calves?

Who gets the dinks?

Who gets the best calves?

Or maybe all calves are marketed at the same time and the money is simply split 1/3 ... 2/3 ... and, out of your piece, you buy replacement cows?

Not trying to be a PITA, just trying to encourage you to make sure you've thought about everything that needs thinking about.

Good luck!



cattletoday.xml

THE WORLD ACCORDING TO HOOTER MCCORMICK -- SQUIRRELED AWAY
Hooter's old friend, Uncas Bingelmeyer was usually more carefree than the owner of a new credit card at a discount store. Today, though, he watched the scenery speed by as if they were approaching doom instead of Tulsa.
PLAN PROPERLY TO MANAGE YEARLING HEIFER BREEDING
Developing and breeding yearling heifers can be equally rewarding and frustrating. The process is too timely and costly to land anywhere short of success. The technology around estrus synchronization continues to evolve and improve. However, the best protocols alone are not enough to create high pregnancy rates. It requires meticulous planning to properly execute the synchronization protocol and nutrition programs. It all matters when fighting for a few percentage points.
WELL-DESIGNED MANAGEMENT SYSTEM REQUIRES PLANNING
Every business has (or should have) a means of measuring and analyzing the various factors that play a role in overall performance and profitability as well as to help in decision making. Cattle operations are no different.
LOOK FOR SIGNS TO REDUCE AND HANDLE HEAT STRESS
Warmer temperatures are quickly approaching, and that means livestock producers should start considering how to help their animals handle the heat.
BLACK INK -- ARE WE THERE YET?
We were bringing a little preschool friend out to our house for the afternoon. She was a town kid and about every three miles, she'd ask, “Are we ALMOST there?”
IT'S THE PITTS -- HOW TO LOAD A HORSE
Here is the correct way to load a horse.
GIVE YOUNG WILDLIFE SPACE TO GROW
Spring is a glorious time of year. Flowers and leaves are not the only signs of new life. Plenty of food and warmer weather make this the perfect time for wildlife to mate and raise their offspring.
BLACK INK -- ARE YOU ON TRACK?
Biology says it takes two years from the day you breed cows till their calves can be harvested for beef or join the breeding herd to calve as two-year-olds. Decisions before, after and during any two-year span can make a big difference.
NATIONAL JUNIOR ANGUS SHOW TO BE HELD IN DES MOINES
Come win with the Angus team in Des Moines, Iowa, at this year's National Junior Angus Show (NJAS) at the Iowa State Fairgrounds.
ALABAMA BCIA ANNOUNCES PUREBRED PRODUCER OF THE YEAR
Clanton, Ala. – The Alabama Beef Cattle Improvement Association (BCIA) named Hillside Angus Farm, Dale and Judy Parris of Albertville as the 2016 Purebred Producer of the Year at the Alabama BCIA 2017 Annual Meeting held in Jemison on March 11.
LAST YEAR'S DROUGHT MAY AFFECT THIS YEAR'S HAY
Starkville, Miss. -- Last year's drought will likely affect this year's hay acreage in Mississippi.
IT'S THE PITTS -- MY FAVORITE FIRES
First, let me state for the record that I am NOT a cowboy poet. I don't have the mustache or the wardrobe for it.
HAVE PLAN IN PLACE WHEN UNEXPECTED COW LOSS OCCURS
It happens. If you own cattle, at some point you will drive out in the pasture and you'll find one with all four feet in the air, or maybe very close to it.
HUNTIN' DAYLIGHT -- CONSUMERS ARE DRIVING PACKER CHANGES
Ultimately, consumers determine what enters and exits the harvest facilities of the nation's largest meat packers. Consumer demand determines which meats they'll consume in terms of quantity and price, or if they'll consume meat at all.
CONTROL FLIES TO AVOID PINKEYE PROBLEMS
We were fortunate this year to have quite a mild winter in the southeast. The grass is growing and we are getting some much-needed rain to fill the ponds that dried up during last year's drought. Unfortunately, along with warmer weather come the flies and various problems associated with the little pests. Severe fly infestations have been associated with increased incidence of pinkeye, or infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK).

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